21世紀は「お客様は神様」ではなくContent is kingの時代

「お客様は神様です」が日本風だとしたら、「コンテンツは王様です」というのが、アメリカ風だろうか。

Content is kingという言葉は、SEOなどのWEBマーケティングに関わっている人なら一度は聞いたことがある言葉。

この言葉、もともとビルゲイツが1996年に公表した言葉だ。

ビル・ゲイツもインターネットの進化スピードに驚いた

日本では1994年に首相官邸がホームページを開設し、

1995年8月25日にWindows95の発売されてから、インターネットの利用率が広がる。(日本では1995年11月23日発売開始)

Windows95の発売に合わせてビルゲイツは1995年10月1日にTHE ROAD AHEADを出版した。(日本では1995年12月11日初版発行。)


ビル・ゲイツ未来を語る

しかし、この本の出版辞典でビルゲイツはインターネットが最重要になるということまでは、認識していなかったようだ。

Windows95の初期版にはインターネット関連機能は搭載されていなかったが、ビルゲイツはリリース後その誤りに気付き、1996年末に発表したOSR2以降でインターネット関連機能が標準搭載された。

その後、Windows95を使えば、インターネットに接続できるというイメージが付いた。

インターネットの重要性に気付いたビルゲイツが発した言葉が、Content is kingだ。

初期のインターネット

僕の家にもWindows95があった。初期のインターネットの思い出といえば、「ピーーぶるぶるぶるぶるぶる、がっこんがっこん」みたいな音が接続のとき毎回鳴っていたのをよく覚えている。

Windows に初期設定で入っていたボードゲームや、追加で買ったゲームをしていた気がする。

パソコンの立ち上げは10分以上かかったし、コンセントが抜けると電源が切れるから停電のときとかは大変だった。

当時飼っていた文鳥はぴよひこという名前だったのだが、

ぴよひこ

「おはよう」とか「ぴよひこ」とか、言葉を覚えさせようと頑張った。

でも1年くらい経って、言葉は残念ながら覚えなかったのだが、

ぴよひこが唯一歌えるようになったのが、「ピーーぶるぶるぶるぶるぶる、がっこんがっこん」というインターネットの接続音だった。

ぴよひこ2

機嫌が良いと、いつも飛び跳ねながら、インターネット接続音の真似をしてぴよぴよ歌っていた。

そのころ、YoutubeやAmazonの出現、iPhoneの出現は見事に予言されていたのだ。

未来予測は大方されている

毎日、Facebook,Google,Amazonなど、24時間インターネットを使っている。20年前は全然そんな生活は考えていなかった。

でも20年前から、この暮らしを詳細に描いて、確実に現実化すると信じて突き進んできた人たちはたくさんいたということだ。

いま世の中に商用として出回っている技術は大体100年前~50年前くらいに学術論文で発表されたものがそのベースになっていると思う。

だから、未来はすでに予測されているということだ。

いま一般的には想像できないようなことも、すでに論文はたくさん出ていて、この20年よりもこれから先の20年のほうがもっと大きな変化があるに違いない。

情報に敏感になることで、確実に未来を予測することができる。

Content is king とは未来予測の秘訣

Content is king とは、圧倒的な好奇心で貪欲に学び、世界一を取ったビルゲイツの生き方の核になる言葉なのだろう。

いまでも「伝染病の撲滅」「蚊とマラリアと人間」「ネズミ、シラミ、文明」といった本を読みあさっている。

ビルゲイツは学んだ知識をすぐに誰かに説明するのが好きで、結核の話や貧困の話も、すぐに社員に語りまくる。

さすがに周りの人もあきれるくらいで、カクテルパーティでは社員はビルゲイツが近づいてくるとあわてて逃げ出すそうだ。

ビルゲイツは「ビル・ゲイツ未来を語る」のなかでこう語った。

これは恐ろしいことだが、コンピューター技術の進展のなかで、ある時代の業界リーダーはけっして次の時期のリーダーにはなれなかったという事実もある。マイクロソフトは”パソコン期”のリーダーだった。ということは、歴史的見地からすれば、情報時代の”ハイウェイ期”のリーダーとしてはマイクロソフトは不適格なのかもしれない。でもわたしはそのジンクスに挑みたい。この先いつか、パソコン期とハイウェイ期の境界の時期がやってくる。わたしは、その境界を越えるはじめての例になりたいと思っている。

成功した企業が陥る進化の溝を越える、その秘策がContent is kingなのであろう。

Content is king の全文

Content Is King – Bill Gates (1/3/1996)

Content is where I expect much of the real money will be made on the Internet, just as it was in broadcasting.

The television revolution that began half a century ago spawned a number of industries, including the manufacturing of TV sets, but the long-term winners were those who used the medium to deliver information and entertainment.

When it comes to an interactive network such as the Internet, the definition of”content” becomes very wide. For example, computer software is a form of content –an extremely important one, and the one that for Microsoft will remain by far the most important.

But the broad opportunities for most companies involve supplying information or entertainment. No company is too small to participate.

One of the exciting things about the Internet is that anyone with a PC and a modem can publish whatever content they can create. In a sense, the Internet is the multimedia equivalent of the photocopier. It allows material to be duplicated at low cost, no matter the size of the audience.

The Internet also allows information to be distributed worldwide at basically zero marginal cost to the publisher. Opportunities are remarkable, and many companies are laying plans to create content for the Internet.

For example, the television network NBC and Microsoft recently agreed to enter the interactive news business together. Our companies will jointly own a cable news network, MSNBC, and an interactive news service on the Internet. NBC will maintain editorial control over the joint venture.

I expect societies will see intense competition – and ample failure as well as success –in all categories of popular content – not just software and news, but also games,entertainment, sports programming, directories, classified advertising, and on-line communities devoted to major interests.

Printed magazines have readerships that share common interests. It’s easy to imagine these communities being served by electronic online editions.

But to be successful online, a magazine can’t just take what it has in print and move it to the electronic realm. There isn’t enough depth or interactivity in print content to overcome the drawbacks of the online medium.

If people are to be expected to put up with turning on a computer to read a screen,they must be rewarded with deep and extremely up-to-date information that they can explore at will. They need to have audio, and possibly video. They need an opportunity for personal involvement that goes far beyond that offered through the letters-to-the-editor pages of print magazines.

A question on many minds is how often the same company that serves an interest group in print will succeed in serving it online. Even the very future of certain printed magazines is called into question by the Internet.

For example, the Internet is already revolutionizing the exchange of specialized scientific information. Printed scientific journals tend to have small circulations,making them high-priced. University libraries are a big part of the market. It’s been an awkward, slow, expensive way to distribute information to a specialized audience, but there hasn’t been an alternative.

Now some researchers are beginning to use the Internet to publish scientific findings.The practice challenges the future of some venerable printed journals.

Over time, the breadth of information on the Internet will be enormous, which will make it compelling. Although the gold rush atmosphere today is primarily confined to the United States, I expect it to sweep the world as communications costs come down and a critical mass of localized content becomes available in different countries.

For the Internet to thrive, content providers must be paid for their work. The long-term prospects are good, but I expect a lot of disappointment in the short-term as content companies struggle to make money through advertising or subscriptions. It isn’t working yet, and it may not for some time.

So far, at least, most of the money and effort put into interactive publishing is little more than a labor of love, or an effort to help promote products sold in the non-electronic world. Often these efforts are based on the belief that over time someone will figure out how to get revenue.

In the long run, advertising is promising. An advantage of interactive advertising is that an initial message needs only to attract attention rather than convey much information. A user can click on the ad to get additional information – and an advertiser can measure whether people are doing so.

But today the amount of subscription revenue or advertising revenue realized on the Internet is near zero – maybe$20 million or $30 million in total. Advertisers are always a little reluctant about a new medium, and the Internet is certainly new and different.

Some reluctance on the part of advertisers may be justified, because many Internet users are less-than-thrilled about seeing advertising. One reason is that many advertisers use big images that take a long time to download across a telephone dial-up connection. A magazine ad takes up space too, but a reader can flip a printed page rapidly.

As connections to the Internet get faster, the annoyance of waiting for an advertisement to load will diminish and then disappear. But that’s a few years off.

Some content companies are experimenting with subscriptions, often with the lure of some free content. It’s tricky, though, because as soon as an electronic community charges a subscription, the number of people who visit the site drops dramatically,reducing the value proposition to advertisers.

A major reason paying for content doesn’t work very well yet is that it’s not practical to charge small amounts. The cost and hassle of electronic transactions makes it impractical to charge less than a fairly high subscription rate.

But within a year the mechanisms will be in place that allow content providers to charge just a cent or a few cents for information. If you decide to visit a page that costs a nickel, you won’t be writing a check or getting a bill in the mail for a nickel. You’ll just click on what you want, knowing you’ll be charged a nickel on an aggregated basis.

This technology will liberate publishers to charge small amounts of money, in the hope of attracting wide audiences.

Those who succeed will propel the Internet forward as a marketplace of ideas,experiences, and products – a marketplace of content.

This essay is copyright© 2001 Microsoft Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

最後の1段落だけを意訳するとこうなる。

“インターネットをアイデア、経験、プロダクトの取引市場に進化させたものが勝つ。つまりコンテンツのマーケットプレイスを作ったものが勝つ。“

僕はこれを「人間の教育と進化のプラットフォームを作ったものが勝つ」という意味に理解している。

未来を予測し障害を飛び越えるために、自分を教育する

情報技術の進化はすでに20年前に多くの人々に予見されていた。

これから20年後の世界も既に予見されている。

時代を読み、乗り越えるためにいつも必要になるのが教育だ。

満足することなく常に自己教育を続けていれば、妙なことにはならない。

先人からたくさんの知恵を借りて、時代を作ろう。

The following two tabs change content below.